Coax Cable
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billt4488
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Coax Cable

Post by billt4488 » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:25 pm

I have run an RG6 cable into a 3 way splitter. While the T.V works on all the outs the internet does not work on any of them. I was wondering if there is a limit on how many times you can split of a single coax cable or why the internet is not working?

ericmark

Post by ericmark » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:11 pm

Why is the internet connected with RG6 cable? It has been years since I have seen any coax connected Ethernet it has been RJ45 for many years.
Also except for Sky I do not know of any internet using an aerial and I think the splits it all within the Sky box anyway.
There are active and passive splitters i.e. Powered and non powered in the main the powered normally increase the signal but the passive non powered very much reduce the signal.
There is also the impedance of the cable and I am not sure if internet uses 75 or 95 ohm and it may require some network to match the outputs.
But I am sure there is something wrong with your question does not seem to make sense as one would not normally combine TV and Ethernet may be you can say exactly what you are doing?
Eric

pole307
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Re: Coax Cable

Post by pole307 » Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:17 pm

[quote="billt4488"]I have run an RG6 cable into a 3 way splitter. While the T.V works on all the outs the internet does not work on any of them. I was wondering if there is a limit on how many times you can split of a single coax cable or why the internet is not working?[/quote]

I'm assuming when you say you're using RG6 for tv and internet we're talking about a cable tv feed?

If so, remember that splitters can be bought in various operational frequency ranges and that cable modems are notorious for taking a while to negotitiate to a free/low noise frequency. So 1) find out what range the splitter you have operates in, 2) check the cable modem to see what it thinks it's doing (if it negotiates an upstream or downstream lock). You could check 1) and 2) by seeing if the SNR values from the modem change massively when placed pre and post the split.

There is a limit on the number of splits (splitters in series), but this depends entirely on the strength of your incoming signal and the quality and tidiness of your joints. Also on the noisyness of the devices on each splitter output. In the past I've had 3 splitters, one on each floor of the house, which allowed me to move TV STBs and the modem about (this was before wireless networking began in force).

Matt

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