RCD protection
Ask questions and find answers to many subjects relating to electrics and electrical work

9 posts   •   Page 1 of 1
tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:26 am

RCD protection

by tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk » Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:35 am

I am installing a kitchen at the moment, which will include extending the existing ring main to include new mains sockets. I have attempted to follow the regulations as much as is possible; e.g. wiring up isolation switches for appliances.

The book I have states that a horizontal run of cable is ok, so long as it is between visible outlets; can anyone confirm this?

The regulations linked to on this site state that when altering existing wiring, all outlets need to be protected by RCDs. For my kitchen, I have specific outlet plates in mind (fancy ones) that do not include an RCD, what is the easiest way to meet this regulation?

thx

sparx
Project Manager
Project Manager
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.

by sparx » Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:25 pm

Hi.
it would seem you are not registered to do this work yourself, so LABC must have been informed before you started and their fee paid as this is work in a kitchen.
Subject to this being so then it is not just the outlets that need RCD protection but the wiring as well.
The only way to do this is to have a RCBO in place of the MCB for the circuit(s) you are altering, or if not possible then an RCD in serted in tails to whole consumer unit.
It is ok to run horizontally between outlet/switches etc, subject to above.
Who is doing your test certs for the work? This is a requirement under Part P of building regs.

Regards Sparx

chriscba
Ganger
Ganger
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:00 pm

rcd

by chriscba » Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:27 pm

RCD 'S are there to protect you from any earth fault, the regs state that one must be fitted. MCB'S protect the circuit i.e the cable, to stop it overloading. So you should upgrade to fuse board with a rcd fitted.

tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:26 am

by tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk » Wed Sep 02, 2009 10:26 pm

Thanks for the reply.

I have recently moved to the property but I think the bloke next door is a sparky judging by his van, so it seems as though he has just got himself some work sorting out the consumer unit. I'll knock on his door and see if he is interested.

He can validate the work I have done so far.

Thanks again.

tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:26 am

by tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:12 am

I thought I would post a final update to the thread for interest.

The sparky next door came around and said that RCD protection would not be needed as we were updating existing wiring, and so would be working under the regulations applicable when it was initially built (15th edition).

However when discussing the cooker and hob requirements, the approach decided was that he would upgrade the consumer unit to bring it up to date to include the appropriate protection, and to wire the cooker unit in on a new dedicated 10mm cable and the induction hob in on a dedicated 6mm cable.

I will continue with the first fix wiring, with the sparky completing the consumer unit, second fix and testing phase.

sparx
Project Manager
Project Manager
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.

by sparx » Sun Sep 06, 2009 11:01 am

Sorry but your 'Sparky' next door is WRONG!!!!!
All new work must be done to latest regs! 17th Ed. otherwise if going to old property wired to say 14th ed we would be wiring lights without earths ect.
Your ring being extended MUST now have RCD protection, it seems as if it will be covered by a new cons. unit anyway but I am surprised by leckies statement re old standards, is he Part-p registered? he should know regs!
regards Sparx

kbrownie
Project Manager
Project Manager
Posts: 1995
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:36 pm

by kbrownie » Sun Sep 06, 2009 7:19 pm

sorry edited posted wrongly,
but sparx is right any new work undertaken should comply to 17th edition.
i.e if working on a particular circuit BS7671:2008 should apply.
Any circuits left untouched there is no need for them to comply to 17th as they have not been altered.
But New CU means a total upgrade to 17th.
Last edited by kbrownie on Mon Sep 07, 2009 8:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.

tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:26 am

Certificates Testing and Signoff

by tmjmed@yahoo.co.uk » Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:23 am

The new consumer unit should cover the new regs as you say, but its a little concerning regarding his take on the regs.

He says he is able to certify and sign off his own tickets (whatever that means). I took that to mean that at the end of this he will test and provide me with the necessary safety certs. I looked up the company on the niceic site, and they are there; so presumably I should be ok.

kbrownie
Project Manager
Project Manager
Posts: 1995
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:36 pm

by kbrownie » Mon Sep 07, 2009 8:35 pm

What your electrician will do is know as self-cert.
He will install new CU, do an Inspection and test of your installation.
Then a Schedule of Inspection, a Schedule of Test results and a Electrical Installation Certificate should be issued.
The electrician will pass these on to his scheme provider (NICEIC in this case) they will inform Building Controls of relevant work done and you will then be sent your documents.

9 posts   •   Page 1 of 1
It is currently Sat Feb 24, 2024 10:42 pm